Chenae1990's Blog











****I decided that I would like to do a video because I would rather do something interesting and out of the ordinary. I want to take a break from writing and typing papers, so doing a video would be more fun!! :^)

***This is a brief idea of what I would like to do for my video, which would be subject to change!!!

****(THE IDEA!!) This is like a script that I would like to put into the video (I’m not sure if I should say some of it and include the quotes in words in a slide) The question that I will be trying to find answers for (if any) is: What is college for? The purpose of college is different for every person, whether you are a graduate, in-coming freshman, child, former student, or a person who have never attended or complete college. According to John R. Thelin in “A History of American Higher Education”, the purpose of college was for young men to “…acquire not only literacy but also a sense of leadership and service by about their twentieth birthday” (Thelin 26). Back in history, white, wealthy men were allowed to go to college to “…be serious about their studies and their religion” (24). The purpose of college was “…transforming little boys into little men” (25).

Now that we are living in the present-time, things about college as well as the purpose of college changed. Nowadays, men and women of all races can choose to go to college according to his/her own special purpose. People may choose to go to college to get a higher education, to get better opportunities of finding jobs with a decent salary, or just for the heck of it. There are too many reasons out here as to why people go to college. Let’s see what a few people have to say about what college is for.

***These are the people I plan on interviewing, which is subject to change:

*Isaac-big brother (college graduate)

*Shondolyn-younger sister (in-coming freshman)

*Jordanna-youngest sister (high school junior)

*Taneshia-older sister (Attended college)

*Adrianna-niece (never attended college-1st grader LOL)

——Before I ask the question what college is for, I would have each person state what they know about college and what they expect college to be like. For those who have already attended college, I would want them to tell me about their own personal experiences. I chose to interview my family because they come in various ages, from young to ancient (old).  I know that you may be wondering why I would be interviewing a 1st grader, but I am doing this because it is different and my niece is smart enough to answer a question like this (I think she can be serious enough to answer). I think that bringing in different age groups would give me a broad view of perspectives in terms of college.

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Gender and mathematics: Is there a link between the two? In terms of mathematics, gender seems to play a role in the subject. There is a stereotype floating around that says that girls are inferior to boys when it comes to their mathematical abilities. One may believe that this is true because girls are less confident in the subject. Do you remember the Barbie dolls that the little girls play with? Well if those girls were listening to a Teen Talk Barbie, they would hear her say something like, “Math is HARD!” (Swanbrow). The gender seems to play a role in girls’ identity, which seems to make them believe that they are not good at math based on the fact that they are a girl. Girls, like Barbie seem not to like math because the subject seems difficult, but does gender really play a role in a child’s ability to do math? Let’s take a walk down research lane and explore some different ideas about the link between gender and mathematics.

            Do you want to know my opinion about the link between gender and mathematics? Well, before I bring in other people’s ideas about the subject, I would like to mention a few words. I do not believe that gender is the only factor for a child’s mathematical abilities; however, the drive and interest of the child should play some kind of role. Say for instance, there are a girl and a boy in the same class learning how to do addition. The girl in this case does better on an addition test. Based on the stereotype that girls are inferior in their math skills to boys, what made this situation switch roles? In this case, the girl is interested in math and finds doing addition problems easy and easy to grasp. I know that this cannot always be the case for all children, so

Scott 2

that is why there are many articles, books and other resources that discuss the topic of math and gender.

            There are people that believe that gender does play a role in a child’s mathematical skills because girls seem to be inferior when it comes to math than to boys. According to research, this statement is a stereotype. According to Melissa Burkley of Psychology Today, the explanation for the difference is varied from genetic to sociocultural (Burkley). Research shows that it is natural that boys are better in math than girls based on evolutionary explanations that suggest that this is because “…our male ancestors had to travel large distances for hunting and had to use their brains to calculate the trajectory of their spears” (Burkley). The article continues stating how the data does not exactly support the argument because according to a study done in 2008, Janet Hyde, a professor of Psychology and Women Studies from the University of Wisconsin Madison, analyzed data from an annual math test for students in the 11th grade in which she found that the difference between the boys’ and girls’ scores is not based on what “little girls do or do not have…” but it is more about what they do with what they have (Burkley).

            Society seems to play a role in the difference in children’s mathematical skills. Referring back to Barbie as mentioned in the introduction, if the children constantly hear the phrase, “math is hard”, what do people expect to happen? (Burkley).The more society accepts that girls are not good in math, the more that the girls will believe it and eventually role with the punches. Society may brainwash most girls into believing that they are not good at math because that is what society says, but there are some girls out there that disagree with that statement.

 

Your rough draft is very interesting!

Your intro is good, and I would do what Mr. M said and put the Barbie sentence first.  I highlighted in blue in the intro where I thought the wording was confusing and same in the second paragraph.

In the second paragraph I put a part in green where I thought it didn’t sound really professional.  If your wanting to put your opinion in that’s great I just think it could be worded a little different. 

The sources you have are integrated nicely and back up your points.  The paper needs to be longer (1250 words) in order to really back up your argument about gender. Add a few more sources and body paragraphs and I think the paper will be even better. 

If you have anymore suggestions just let me know.



{May 10, 2010}   Gender and Mathematics!

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NO0cvqT1tAE This is a link of Barbie saying how math class is tough! Included here is another video from wttw channel 11, which covers a segment on a discussion about how being reminded of negative stereotypes would impact the performance in math: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjn6ZSU_zS0&feature=related

Chenae Scott

Michael Moore

Wrd 104

10 May 2010

                                                Gender and Mathematics

             Gender and mathematics: Is there a link between the two? In terms of mathematics, gender seems to play a role in the subject. There is a stereotype that says that girls/women are inferior to boys/men when it comes to their mathematical abilities. “Math is HARD!” Do you remember the Barbie dolls that the little girls play with? Well if those girls were listening to a Teen Talk Barbie, they would hear her say something like that (Swanbrow).  One may believe that this is true because girls/women are less confident in the subject. The gender plays a role in girls’ identity, which make them believe that they are not good at math based on the fact that they are females. Girls/women, like Barbie seem not to like math because the subject seems difficult, but does gender really play a role in a person’s ability to do math? Let’s take a walk down research lane and explore some different ideas about the link between gender and mathematics.

            Before I bring in other people’s ideas about the subject, I would like to mention a few ideas of my own. Gender should not be considered as the only factor played in a person’s mathematical abilities; however, the drive and interest of the child should play some kind of role. Say for instance, there are a girl and a boy in the same class learning how to do a certain kind of math problem, for time’s sake, let’s say, algebra.  The girl in this case does better on an algebra test than the boy does. Based on the stereotype that girls are inferior in their math skills to boys, what made this situation switch roles? In this case, the girl is interested in math and finds doing algebraic problems easy and effortless to grasp. I know that this cannot always be the case for all, so that is why there are many articles, books and other resources that discuss the topic of math and gender girls based on evolutionary explanations that suggest that this is because “…our male ancestors had to travel large distances for hunting and had to use their brains to calculate the trajectory of their spears” (Burkley). The article continues stating how the data does not exactly support the argument because according to a study done in 2008, Janet Hyde, a professor of Psychology and Women Studies from the University of Wisconsin Madison, analyzed data from an annual math test for students in the 11th grade in which she found that the difference between the boys’ and girls’ scores is not based on what “little girls do or do not have…” but it is more about what they do with what they have (Burkley).

            Society seems to play a role in the difference in children’s mathematical skills. Referring back to Barbie as mentioned in the introduction, if the children constantly hear the phrase, “math is hard”, what do people expect to happen? (Burkley).The more society accepts that girls are not good in math, the more that the girls will believe it and eventually role with the punches. This is also true according to Kurtz-Costes, Rowley, Harris-Britt ad Woods, who did research on the same topic and suggested that girls would less likely pursue a career in computer science and engineering than boys due to the “role of gender stereotypes in the development of children’s self-perceptions of mathematics and science abilities” (388). Society may brainwash most girls into believing that they are not good at math because that is what society says, but there are some girls out there that disagree with that statement..

            There are people that believe that gender does play a role in a child’s mathematical skills because girls seem to be inferior when it comes to math than to boys. According to research, this statement is a stereotype. According to Melissa Burkley of Psychology Today, the explanation for the difference is varied from genetic to sociocultural (Burkley). Research shows that it is natural that boys are better in math than

            Gender is not the only factor that impacts a person’s mathematical abilities. In a video on You Tube, there was a segment on WTTW channel eleven, where Allen McConnell and Sian Beilock discussed the subject of stereotypes. According to Sian Beilock from the University of Chicago, being reminded of negative stereotypes would impact the performance in math. There was a study done with women who were reminded that there are stereotypes out there that says that women are not as good in math as men. Beilock wanted to see if that reminder would have an affect on the women’s test results, which it did. Their math scores dropped 10-15% based on that basic reminder of negative stereotypes (www.youtube.com).   

            Because females are reminded of negative stereotypes, how much do you think a few simple phrases from Barbie impact a person’s mathematical skills? If you follow the link above, you would see a video from You Tube from Barbie stating that, “Math class is tough!” As you can see, the Barbie is all dressed up in her brightly colored clothes and a wearing a nice smile on her face. Her identity alone shows the stereotype of the type of girl who would not like to do math and the evidence is shown based on some other phrases in the video. Barbie continues saying, “Party dresses are fun. I will always be here to help you. Do you have a crush on anyone?” (www.youtube.com). These phrases are obvious stereotypes because the character Barbie portrays a party-type girl who cares about being fashionable and having fun. Do you think that Barbie would even have time for math, with all that shopping she has to get done?

            Barbie’s image and phrases plays a role in young girls’ lives in particular because they are used to playing with Barbie dolls and use her as a type of role model. Based on what you saw in the video, would you consider Barbie being a good role model for girls? The way Barbie is portrayed in the video shows that she has priorities out of order. By what she says, you can assume that Barbie cares more about her image and crushes than BORING OLD MATH! Math is too hard for Barbie, so she should stick to what she knows best, right? Barbie is the wrong model for young girls to be copying because she reflects what society thinks females should be in life.

            Let’s step away from the Barbie situation and move forward to other matters. Now that we have figured out that gender is not the only role played in mathematical abilities and it includes stereotypes of society, we could consider the role that negative stereotypes play in terms of the predicament called the stereotype threat. If you are unfamiliar with this term, let me tell you what it means. A stereotype threat in this case, is “when women perform math, unlike men, they risk being judged by the negative stereotype that women have weaker math ability” (Spencer, Steele, and Quinn 4). According to research, women may feel that math is not an important domain and feel that they do not belong in math classes. In the Top Colleges Blog, there were more women who are getting engaged in math, but there is still the stereotypes that are “getting in the way of progress” (www.top-colleges.com). According to research, there were more than the stereotypes that kept females from being engaged in math, which was “small things like a course in spatial skills for women…” (www.top-colleges.com).

            Gender and negative stereotypes play a major role in mathematical skills from the younger years to the adult years. Females are less confident in math due to the hearing of constant negative stereotypes from society. At a young age, society and the stereotypes impact a female’s future in the adult world because females may not want to pursue a career in engineering, computer sciences, or any other job that includes mathematical abilities. Researchers believe that females would achieve in the mathematic fields if there were “more mentors and role models for girls to look up to” (which does NOT include Barbie) (www.top-colleges.com).

                                                              Works Cited

  1. Kurtz-Costes, Beth, Stephanie J. Rowley, April Harris-Britt, and Taniesha A. Woods.       “Gender Stereotypes about Mathematics and Science and Self-Perceptions of           Ability in Late Childhood and Early Adolescence.” Merrill-Palmer   Quarterly 5th ser. 54 (2008): 386-      409. Web. 9 May 2010.
  2. “Researchers Find Gender Stereotypes Still Exist in Math and Sciences Field.” Web log    post.    Top Colleges Blog. Web. 9 May 2010. <http://www.top- colleges.com/blog/2010/03/26/researchers-find-gender-stereotypes-still-exist-in-         math-   and-sciences-field/>.
  3. Spencer, Steven J., Claude M. Steele, and Diane M. Quinn. “Stereotype Threat and           Women’s Math Performance.” Journal of Experimental Social Psychology (1999):   4-28. Web. 9 May 2010.
  4. Swanbrow, Diane. “Lessons from Barbie: Women and Math.” The University Record         Online. 14 Feb. 2007. Web. 6 May 2010.        <http://www.ur.umich.edu/0607/Feb12_07/04.shtml&gt;.
  5. YouTube – Teen Talk RARE “Math Class Is Tough” Barbie! Working! YouTube – Broadcast Yourself. 30 Nov. 2009. Web. 6 May 2010.           <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NO0cvqT1tAE&gt;.

     6.  YouTube – Women, Math, and Stereotype Threat. Perf. Allen McConnell and Sian Beilock. YouTube – Broadcast Yourself. 22 June 2007. Web. 6 May 2010.             <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjn6ZSU_zS0&feature=related&gt;.



{May 4, 2010}   My Editorial Checklist

*Please make suggestions about how to make a good thesis statement for introduction.

*Is the organization of the paper flowing? If not, how can it be changed?

*Is the question too broad or too narrow?

*Am I asking too many exploratory questions?

*Am I integrating my sources correctly, am I using too many quotes, or not enough?

* Would this paper be appealing to the audience?



{May 3, 2010}   Remix of Ruff Draft

Chenae Scott

Michael Moore

Wrd 104

May 3, 2010

                                                Gender and Mathematics

  **** Warning: This draft is very rough, so feel free to comment on anything, no matter how harsh the comments may be. 

 Gender and mathematics: Is there a link between the two? In terms of mathematics, gender seems to play a role in the subject. There is a stereotype floating around that says that girls are inferior to boys when it comes to their mathematical abilities. One may believe that this is true because girls are less confident in the subject. Do you remember the Barbie dolls that the little girls play with? Well if those girls were listening to a Teen Talk Barbie, they would hear her say something like, “Math is HARD!” (Swanbrow). The gender seems to play a role in girls’ identity, which seems to make them believe that they are not good at math based on the fact that they are a girl. Girls, like Barbie seem not to like math because the subject seems difficult, but does gender really play a role in a child’s ability to do math? Let’s take a walk down research lane and explore some different ideas about the link between gender and mathematics.

            Do you want to know my opinion about the link between gender and mathematics? Well, before I bring in other people’s ideas about the subject, I would like to mention a few words. I do not believe that gender is the only factor for a child’s mathematical abilities; however, the drive and interest of the child should play some kind of role. Say for instance, there are a girl and a boy in the same class learning how to do addition. The girl in this case does better on an addition test. Based on the stereotype that girls are inferior in their math skills to boys, what made this situation switch roles? In this case, the girl is interested in math and finds doing addition problems easy and easy to grasp. I know that this cannot always be the case for all children, so

Scott 2

that is why there are many articles, books and other resources that discuss the topic of math and gender.

            There are people that believe that gender does play a role in a child’s mathematical skills because girls seem to be inferior when it comes to math than to boys. According to research, this statement is a stereotype. According to Melissa Burkley of Psychology Today, the explanation for the difference is varied from genetic to sociocultural (Burkley). Research shows that it is natural that boys are better in math than girls based on evolutionary explanations that suggest that this is because “…our male ancestors had to travel large distances for hunting and had to use their brains to calculate the trajectory of their spears” (Burkley). The article continues stating how the data does not exactly support the argument because according to a study done in 2008, Janet Hyde, a professor of Psychology and Women Studies from the University of Wisconsin Madison, analyzed data from an annual math test for students in the 11th grade in which she found that the difference between the boys’ and girls’ scores is not based on what “little girls do or do not have…” but it is more about what they do with what they have (Burkley).

            Society seems to play a role in the difference in children’s mathematical skills. Referring back to Barbie as mentioned in the introduction, if the children constantly hear the phrase, “math is hard”, what do people expect to happen? (Burkley).The more society accepts that girls are not good in math, the more that the girls will believe it and eventually role with the punches. Society may brainwash most girls into believing that they are not good at math because that is what society says, but there are some girls out there that disagree with that statement.



{April 26, 2010}   R3s3aRcH Proj3cT Pr0posaL!

Research question: Is there a relationship between gender and mathematics? If so, what is that relationship?

My Process:

1) Choosing a topic: I was interested in the subject of mathematics and at first wanted to research something that dealt with careers in math.

***New topic: Math and gender

2) Narrowing a Topic: When I chose the topic, I thought of a question that I thought would fit the topic perfectly. What careers in the Mathematics field are available to students with a Math major? The problem was that I couldn’t really do any research on this question. While working on the Library database, I saw an interesting article about gender and mathematics. When I glanced at the article, I saw that there was an issue raised, I believe that mentioned females becoming engineers.

This topic interested me more than my original question, so I decided to change my question to: Is there a relationship between gender and math? If so, what is the difference?

***Narrowed topic: Relationship between math and gender

3) Issue: Math and its effects on career choices for women; math and its effects on test scores in school

4)Research question: This is not a definite question, but What effects does math have on career choices for women? OR How does math effect boys’ and girls’ test scores in elementary schools?

***Audience: I would say that my topic  and question is relevant to those who are students with Math majors, interested in the issues that deal with math such as careers and statistics. This is relevant to those people because I feel that my topic and question would be interesting to those who are interested in the math field. This topic and question would be interesting to those who are especially interested in addressing the issues and politics of math.

Citations & precis:

***Klein, Pnina (04/01/2010). “Mathematical thinking of kindergarten boys and girls: similar achievement, different contributing processes.”. Educational studies in mathematics (0013-1954), 73 (3), p. 233.

The article suggests that there is no gender differences between the mathematical achievements of boys and girls. Pnina Klein supports this argument by addressing the spatial and verbal skills of the children were related to their mathematic performance by the skills suggesting that they have different ways to solving math problems. The author’s purpose for writing this article was to discuss the gender differences in relations to math, verbal and spatial skills in elementary schools in order to inform the reader about how gender has nothing to do with the children’s mathematical abilities. From this article, the intended audience is people who are studying the effects of children’s mathematical skills and other factors that may effect those skills.

***Thilmany, Jean (03/01/2010). “MATH BY GENDER.”. Mechanical engineering (New York, N.Y. 1919) (0025-6501), 132 (3), p. 15.

This article suggests the female mathematical ability is not worse than boys’ ability, but the thing is that boys seem to be more confident when it comes to math. Jean Thilmany supports the argument by introducing studies and explained how girls’ low confidence show how unlikely they are to get careers in science, technology, math and engineering. The purpose of this article is to inform the reader about studies based on different math abilities among girls in order to address issues such as stereotypes of inferiority in mathematics. This article is intended for people who are interested in the political issues of mathematics and interested in the relationship between math and gender based on different stereotypes.

***Smith, Alice E (03/01/2010). “Women in engineering in Turkey – a large scale quantitative and qualitative examination.”. European journal of engineering education (0304-3797), 35 (1), p. 45.

In this article, Alice Smith argues that women in Turkey who take jobs in the engineering field because they enjoy mathematics and the sciences of it. The author develops, structures and supports the argument by explaining how gender play a role in the engineering field because the women feel that males have more opportunity than they have. The purpose of this article is to get the reader to understand how gender plays an important role in the professional world when it comes to dealing with jobs that women are unlikely to take such as engineering. This particular article is intended for an audience who is interested in gender that is played in the professional world and it is for people who are interested in the study of engineering and the politics of the field.



{April 20, 2010}   Research Question

What is the relationship between gender and mathematics?



What well-paying careers are available for students after they graduate with a Bachelor’s degree in Mathematics?



{April 6, 2010}   Interrupted Reading Analysis!

Conlon, James. “Men Reading Women Reading Interpreting Images of Women Readers.” Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies 26.2 (2005) 37-38.

In this article, it states, “…the woman reading-any woman genuinely engaged in a text-can only be threatening to men” (40). I see this statement to be true; that is why I think Corot made the girl in the painting look depressed. Since a woman reading makes the men feel “inferior”, I guess Corot wanted to find a way for it to be turned the other way around. I think he wanted to secretly say, “Yeah, you can have your reading girl, but you won’t be able to focus on it, so I’ll make you feel depressed about it.” The painting is about a girl who seems to be depressed by someone and I think that she wanted to read in order to stop thinking about that depression, but someone disturbed her reading.

“Corot Art Authentication.” Freemanart Consultancy. 3 April 2010. http://www.freemanart.ca/corot_authentication.htm.

I really want to talk about the research I found from this article because it was interesting. The author did not mention “Interrupted Reading,” but I think that this article is significant because it actually made me wonder if “Interrupted Reading” in the Art Institute is the real work of Corot’s or is it a mere copy from one of his former students or artists that wanted to be like him. This article made me wonder if the works of any artist is the real thing, or just a mere copy of an artist’s work.



{April 5, 2010}   Interrupted Reading

 

Rhetorical Precis # 1

“Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot.” The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition.2008.

      Encyclopedia.com. 3 April 2010. http://www.infoplease.com.

In this article, which was made to provide a brief description of Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot’s life as a painter, suggests that Corot was an influential painter. The author reviews some of Corot’s travels to places such as Italy, Switzerland, Holland, England and some of his works, which show how his form of landscape paintings changed overtime. Since Corot’s life and his works made an influence, the author mentions Femme a la Perle and Interrupted Reading in order to compare his landscape paintings to later works. “Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot” contains a brief description of Corot’s career, life, works ad influences and is intended for an audience interested in the arts of painting.

Precis # 2

“Corot Art Authentication.” Freemanart Consultancy. 3 April 2010. http://www.freemanart.ca/corot_authentication.htm.

In this article, the author claims that Jean-Baptiste was a faked artist, who allowed other artists to freely copy his work. The author reviews some of the scandals that were made, which showed how Corot’s “pupils'” attempts to copy his works raised a huge question of authencity. The author’s purpose of proposing this piece was to get raise the issue of authencity in order to make people aware of this issue and to solve this problem. “Corot Art Authentication”consists of a claim that raises an important issue in art, which was intended for an audience interested in art and the politics behind its authenticity.

Precis # 3

“Corot, Jean Baptiste Camille (1796-1875) – 1865-70 Interrupted Reading.”

     Flickr. 6 February 2009. 4 April 2010.    <http://www.flickr.com/photos/32357038@N08/3258699139/>.

In this article, the author claims that Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot divide his work in sections and starts his work, then go back to finish at another time. The author supports the claim by the author stating how Corot would start a piece of art and finishing it later; he explained how Corot took his time with his work to make his details clear and precise. The purpose of this article was to show the audience how his strategies of painting changed overtime. This article is intended for an audience who is interested in studying art and learning different methods of painting.



et cetera